Pondering Reliable Wisdom

 J.K. Rowling reads from Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone at the Easter Egg Roll at White House. (Photograph by Daniel Ogren. Creative Commons.)

William “Bud” Hart, of Haverhill, shares “Success Principles”—ideas for living a greater, better and more accomplished life, and building habits that stick. He also coaches clients to incorporate strategies for boosting their mental and physical performance during everyday living.

William “Bud” Hart, of Haverhill, shares “Success Principles”—ideas for living a greater, better and more accomplished life, and building habits that stick. He also coaches clients to incorporate strategies for boosting their mental and physical performance during everyday living.

I recently began writing and publishing weekly articles about work, life and success principles. For me this work continues to be very meaningful. Writing is not easy, it takes time and it is not like most of the work I do as a professional that makes me money, at the moment anyway. But it does really push my creative limits and leave me feeling really fulfilled at the end of a long day.

My hope in writing articles is to use my work experience and awareness to inspire, motivate and challenge people to follow their dreams; but a peculiar thing keeps happening. It seems to me that a great deal of what I write about leads me to ponder the possibility that we are all constantly in touch with and guided by a reliable Wisdom. I see it as an intuitive insight that can and will lead us to work that helps us fulfill our dreams, if we know how to log on and follow it.

I believe all of us are born with a God-given purpose. Along with this end we get an intuitive inner calling and seeds planted inside us that tell us what we like and are good at doing—the type of work that we are suited best to do. We need to attend to and nurture this prompting and these seeds if we expect them to grow and help us realize our purpose. In our economic system, this is not always easy. Most of us learn to see our work as a means, but not an end. In other words, a job makes us a living, but it doesn’t necessarily endow a life that we want every day.

As a person tasked with some big challenges in a wide variety of job responsibilities over the years I have worked hard to learn and deliver great products. I have been able to switch between jobs and projects, in management, finance, sales, education and more, almost seamlessly. The thing that I have understood and enjoyed with all the companies and all the tasks I have worked on is I get to solve problems. Helping people work out difficulties and get what they want keeps my work interesting and it’s one of the favorite things that I love about my job.

As I think about it, I am fortunate to be able to make a living doing work that matters to me and nurtures the talents and skills I was born with. For many—maybe even most—people, the work they do and the work they would like to do get caught up in a whirlwind of conflicting needs and emotions—sometimes derailing for a time and sometimes even squashing entirely what it is they are best suited to do and would like to do most to make a living.

Do you ever consider your intuitive voice and the seeds of your talents and gifts? Are you talented in sports, music or math? Are you a thinker and a problem solver? Do you enjoy listening and helping others succeed? Can you inspire and motivate others to act with your words? Are you creative and skilled at building ideas and companies and organizations? Have you ever taken the time to pay attention to the things and activities that interest you; things others may have said you are good at, things in which you excel?

From an early age J.K. Rowling wanted to be a writer. She wrote her first book at the age of six.  She has said that on crowded train ride in June of 1990, the character of Harry Potter jumped into her head. That same day, when she got back to London, she started to write the first book. And she continued daily, even while struggling to support her daughter Jessica and herself on welfare. We all know where her inner voice and the seeds planted inside her took her.

I wonder how many people give up on their dream before their own train ride, the day when their own idea is just about to come together in their mind. Unlike J.K. Rowling I have not always wanted to be a writer and I honestly say I have no J.K. Rowling aspiration in mind right now for my writing. I just like doing it. So, I will continue to listen to the tiny voice that I hear every day. And I’ll put in the time and nurture the seeds inside me. You might want to do the same. As long as we do who knows what ideas and opportunities might come of it?

As J.K. Rowling herself once put it, “Destiny is a name often given in retrospect to choices that had dramatic consequences.”

William “Bud” Hart is a certified “Mindset” Coach, Accountability Partner and Business Consultant. Visit Hart Group, www.hartgroupma.com for more on coaching.

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